Video games adapted from movies fare poorly against their big-screen counterparts

While major movie franchises have been successful on the big screen, movies turned video games haven’t lived up to their own hype, according to Gamble.

Using ratings from IMDb and Metacritic as well as box office reviews, Mr. Gamble created a definitive ranking of the biggest movie franchises and whether their video game counterparts were a complete hit or flop.

Mr. Gamble pointed out the following:

The Ghostbusters video game definitely freaked out some fans
This supernatural horror-comedy centered on a group of eccentric scientists exploring paranormal activity in New York City has become a cult following since its initial release in 1984.






With an impressive £242 million ($417 million) at the box office worldwide, the film was a surefire hit.

However, his counterpart, Ghostbusters: The Video Gameonly managed to collect £2 million ($3.4 million) from relatively disappointing sales.

Avengers producers rave about £302m ($521m) box office success
Another classic and fan favorite on the list, the avengers The franchise has managed to rake in billions of pounds, with unique storylines and some of the most famous superhero characters in the world.

One of the films in the franchise, Captain America: Super Soldierlaunched an online slot game by Playtech and achieved over £9 million ($15.5 million) in sales and received an average review of 5.5 stars.

However, its cinematic counterpart, Captain America: The First Avengerbroke box office ratings, grossing £302 million ($521 million).

Creating a video game as iconic as the movie was mission impossible
Although it’s been another cult classic for 25 years, Impossible mission received a fairly low rating of 59 on Metacritic. However, the film was clearly a renowned success, grossing £373m ($643m) at the box office.

The movies’ video game counterparts, the Mission: Impossible game and the slots game, managed to garner just £28 million ($48 million) in sales (more than 10 times less than the movie) , despite earning a 6.6-star rating.

This first appeared in the CommsWire subscription newsletter on August 19, 2022.

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Carolyn M. Daniel